How to Grow Jewelweed: A North American Native Plant


If you’re looking for a plant that thrives in wet soil and deep shade, look no further than the jewelweed, also known as Impatiens capensis.

This North American native grows quickly in the spring, reaching heights of up to 5 feet tall. It has weak branching stems and oval, blue-green leaves that are toothed and fuzzy.

In the summer, cornucopia flower clusters emerge and mature into seed capsules which split at the touch of a finger when they are ripe.

Common Name Jewelweed, orange jewelweed, spotted touch-me-not
Botanical Name Impatiens capensis
Family Balsaminaceae
Plant Type Annual
Mature Size 2-5 ft. tall, 1.5-2.5 ft. wide
Sun Exposure Partial, shade
Soil Type Moist
Soil pH Acidic, neutral
Bloom Time Summer, fall
Flower Color Orange, yellow
Hardiness Zones 2-11 (USDA)
Native Area North America

Tips for Keeping Your Plants Healthy

  • To keep your jewelweed plants healthy, it is important to give them the right growing conditions. They prefer soil that is high in organic matter and moist but well-drained.
  • Jewelweed will tolerate some sun, but it does best in partial shade or full shade. If you live in an area with hot summers, afternoon shade is especially important.
  • Jewelweed does not like to be transplanted, so it is best to start seeds indoors about six weeks before the last frost date in your area.
  • Seeds can also be sown directly outdoors after the danger of frost has passed. Jewelweed is a self-seeding plant, so you will probably not need to replant it every year.

Lighting and Temperature

Jewelweed prefers partial shade, but can tolerate full sun as long as the soil is moist. It grows best in average to moist conditions with temperatures ranging from 60 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

If you live in an area with hot summers, jewelweed will go dormant after blooming and should be watered less frequently.

Soil

Jewelweed grows best in rich, moist soil that is high in organic matter. The ideal pH range for jewelweed is between six and seven.

If your soil is too alkaline, you can lower the pH by adding sulfur to it. You can raise the pH by adding lime to the soil

Fertilizer

Fertilizer is not necessary for jewelweed, as it is a native plant that does just fine in poor soil. In fact, too much fertilizer will cause the plant to produce more leaves and fewer flowers.

Pruning

Pruning is not necessary, but if you want to keep your jewelweed under control, cut it back in early summer.

If you have jewelweed in your garden, you’re probably familiar with its cousin, the impatiens (Impatiens walleriana).

Watering

Watering jewelweed is important for its growth. The plant does best in moist to wet soil, so be sure to water it regularly.

It’s also a good idea to mulch around the plant to help keep the soil moist.

Size

Jewelweed typically grows to be about waist-high on an adult, with branching stems and oval leaves.

The leaves are usually a blue-green color and have teeth along the edges. They also tend to be fuzzy or hairy.

The plant gets its name from the fact that the flowers it produces are often very jewel-like in appearance.

Flowering

Flowering jewelweed in bloom is a beautiful sight. The plant’s showy flowers are what make it a popular choice for gardens.

Jewelweed blooms from early summer to fall, and the flowers come in shades of orange, yellow, and red.

Common Problems With Jewelweed

Jewelweed is a hardy plant that usually thrives in a variety of conditions. However, there are some environmental issues that can cause problems for jewelweed.

One such issue is drought. If jewelweed does not receive enough moisture, the plants will die quickly. It is important to check the moisture levels of jewelweed on a regular basis, especially during dry and hot weather.

In some cases, it may be necessary to water jewelweed several times per week. Another environmental issue that can cause problems for jewelweed is frost.

Frost can cause the leaves of jewelweed to drop off. Consequently, it is important to wait until there is no chance of frost before planting jewelweed in the springtime.

Propagating Jewelweed

Jewelweed is a hardy plant that usually thrives in a variety of conditions. However, there are some environmental issues that can cause problems for jewelweed.

One such issue is drought. If jewelweed does not receive enough moisture, the plants will die quickly. It is important to check the moisture levels of jewelweed on a regular basis, especially during dry and hot weather.

In some cases, it may be necessary to water jewelweed several times per week. Another environmental issue that can cause problems for jewelweed is frost.

Frost can cause the leaves of jewelweed to drop off. Consequently, it is important to wait until there is no chance of frost before planting jewelweed in the springtime.

How is jewelweed spread?

Jewelweed is a native North American plant that gets its common name from the way water droplets bead up and roll off the shiny leaves of the plant.

The plants grows in damp or shady areas, and can reach a height of 3 feet. Jewelweed has small, orange or yellow flowers that bloom from July to September.

The leaves of the plant are opposite each other on the stem, and are usually 3-5 inches long and 2-3 inches wide. The leaves have a rounded shape and a slightly toothed edge.

Jewelweed is spread through seed production. Each plant can produce thousands of seeds that are spread by wind, water, animals, and humans. Once established, jewelweed can easily take over an area if it is not managed properly.

However, jewelweed is a valuable plant because it helps to prevent soil erosion and provides food for pollinators.

Will deer eat jewelweed?

Jewelweed is a common plant found in many gardens and yards. It is a favorite of deer and is often mowed to ankle height.

Certain species are able to grow new leaves as deer eat other areas, but the recovering plants are rare. It’s difficult to find a plant that is complete.

Jewelweed is not only eaten by deer, but also by rabbits and groundhogs. The plants are usually found in shady areas and like to grow in moist soil.

If you have jewelweed in your garden, you may want to consider fencing it off or taking other measures to protect it from these hungry animals.

Does jewelweed really work for poison ivy?

Every year, millions of people suffer from the itchy, blistering rash caused by poison ivy. For generations, jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) has been used as a folk remedy for poison ivy dermatitis.

But does it really work? A recent study put jewelweed to the test. The results showed that a mash of the plant was beneficial in reducing poison-ivy dermatology, as well as supporting ethnobotanical usage.

However, extracts of jewelweed did not work; soaps made from extracts from these plants were effective, but not as effective as soaps without jewelweed.

While jewelweed may not be a miracle cure for poison ivy, it can still be helpful in relieving the itch and discomfort associated with this pesky plant.

Why are they called touch-me-not?

The family of plants known as touch-me-nots gets its name from the explosive seed pods of one of its most commonly known members, Impatiens capensis.

When ripe, these pods will burst open at the slightest touch, sending seeds flying in all directions. This mechanism helps to ensure that the plant’s offspring are widely dispersed, and it also helps to avoid predation by animals that might otherwise eat the seeds.

Touch-me-nots are found all over the world, and they come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. While many of these plants are grown for their beautiful flowers, others are valued for their leaves, which can be used in salads or cooked as greens.

No matter what their appearance, all touch-me-nots share a common ability to disperse their seeds far and wide.

What is the scientific name of touch-me-not?

The scientific name of touch-me-not is Mimosa pudica. This plant is native to tropical and subtropical regions of the world, including South America, India, and Africa.

The touch-me-not gets its name from its leaves, which close up when they are touched or brushed against. The plant is also commonly known as sensitive plant, bashful plant, and shame plant.

In addition to its unusual leaf movement, the touch-me-not is also notable for its pretty pink flowers. When in bloom, the plant looks like it is covered in tiny feathers.

The touch-me-not is a popular houseplant and can be found in many greenhouses and nurseries.

Is jewelweed the same as touch-me-not?

The plantain family is large and jewelweed and touch-me-not are just two of the many members. Both plants have similarities in appearance and both belong to the order Geraniales.

They are also both annuals, which means they complete their life cycle in one year. However, there are several key differences between jewelweed and touch-me-not.

Jewelweed typically has larger blooms than touch-me-not, and the blooms are usually more lemon-yellow in color with fewer smaller spots that are reddish.

Jewelweed also tends to grow taller than touch-me-not, sometimes reaching heights of up to seven feet. In contrast, touch-me-not typically only grows to be about three feet tall.

When touched, the stems of jewelweed will often ooze a clear sap, while the stems of touch-me-not do not.

This sap is believed to have some soothing properties for skin irritations such as poison ivy or stinging nettle.

So while jewelweed and touch-me-not may look similar at first glance, they are actually quite different plants.

What can you do with jewelweed?

Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) is a wildflower that can be found growing across North America. Also known as touch-me-not, jewelweed is often seen growing in damp, shady areas near streams or ponds.

The plant gets its name from its delicate flowers, which have a tendency to shatter when touched.

Jewelweed has a long history of use in folk medicine, and the leaves and stems of the plant can be used to make a variety of herbal remedies.

jewelweed can be used as an anti-inflammatory agent, anti-histamine and anti-fungal. It’s been utilized for centuries to treat poison Ivy. It’s often seen growing close to poison Ivy.

It has also been successfully used to treat skin conditions such as eczema, insect bites, nettle skin rashes and fungal infections.

Jewelweed is easily cultivated and can be grown in most home gardens. The plants prefer moist soil and will do best in partial shade.

If you’re interested in using jewelweed for medicinal purposes, the leaves and stems can be harvested fresh or dried for brewing teas or creating ointments and salves.

Fresh jewelweed can also be applied directly to the skin to soothe rashes or relieve

What time of year does jewelweed bloom?

Jewelweed is a common wildflower that blooms in the summer and is often found growing near streams or other bodies of water.

The plants are annuals, meaning they live for one growing season and then die. Jewelweed generally starts sprouting in early spring, reaches its full size by August, and begins flowering in mid-summer.

The flowers will continue to bloom until the first frost kills the plant. Jewelweed gets its name from the jewel-like appearance of its seed pods, which are round and slightly flattened with small bumps on the surface.

The bumps contain tiny seeds that are released when the pod bursts open.

Is jewelweed an annual or perennial?

Jewelweed is a common wildflower that blooms in the summer and is often found growing near streams or other bodies of water. The plants are annuals, meaning they live for one growing season and then die.

Jewelweed generally starts sprouting in early spring, reaches its full size by August, and begins flowering in mid-summer. The flowers will continue to bloom until the first frost kills the plant.

Jewelweed gets its name from the jewel-like appearance of its seed pods, which are round and slightly flattened with small bumps on the surface.

The bumps contain tiny seeds that are released when the pod bursts open.

Jessica Miles

Jessica Miles is a writer for Botanique Boutique, a plant and gardening blog. She has always loved plants, flowers, and anything green. When she was younger, she used to watch her grandfather garden and would be in awe of the beautiful flowers he would grow. Now Jessica writes about all things related to plants and gardening - from beginner tips on how to start growing your own plants, to in-depth guides on caring for a specific type of flower or plant. She loves helping others learn about this fascinating hobby, and hopes that her writing will inspire people to get outside and enjoy nature!

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